Want to see what programs and policies MNCAA cities are undertaking and promoting?

Click below to read and download our Climate Action Compendium, a detailed inventory of municipal actions on climate change and other sustainability issues. 


Click a city below to automatically scroll to more details:



Ann Arbor, Michigan

Targets:

  • 2025: reduce GHGs 25% from 2000 levels
  • 2050: reduce GHGs 90% from 2000 levels

Actions:

  • City Council supported self-funding for community energy programs and community engagement on climate change (the Ann Arbor Climate Partnership)
  • Continued resourcing for Michigan’s first Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program
  • Largest city facility solar installation (42 kW) on major affordable housing site a2energy Revolving Loan Fund for Rental Housing created
  • First bike share program (ArborBike) launched summer of 2015
  • Feasibility studies starting for expanded organics collection and potential community biodigester

Aspen, Colorado

Targets:

  • 30% by 2010 and 80% by 2050 below 2004 GHG baseline
  • 100% renewable utility by 2015 - achieved

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Achieved 100% renewable energy for local utility
  • Funding for energy efficiency work comes from a carbon tax on development (Renewable Energy Mitigation Program)
  • Reduced community GHG emissions in 2014 7.5% while population and taxable sales grew
  • Reduced City-operations GHG emissions in 2015 by 42%
  • Implemented first rural Bus Rapid Transit system in US – serving 2 million passengers a year
  • Implemented first rural Bike Share systems in US
  • Member of Compact of Mayors, ICLEI
  • Creating regional climate resiliency plan to protect against drought, fires, mudslides and changing snowpack
  • Participating as a semi-finalist in the Georgetown University Energy Prize, competing to win $5 million if Aspen reduces residential energy more than other competing towns

Atlanta, Georgia

Targets:

  • 20% by 2020, 40% by 2030, and 80% by 2040, below 2009 GHG baseline

Significant Climate Actions:

  • GHG inventories are performed regularly and follow GPC standard.
  • The Atlanta Climate Action Plan has been completed and it has been submitted to the City Council for adoption.
  • Major commitments highlighted in the Compact of Mayors

New Actions to Announce:

  • 100 million square feet of commercial building space committed to the DoE Better Buildings Challenge. All participants in the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge commit to reducing energy and water consumption 20% by 2020.


Austin, Texas

Targets:

  • Net zero community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.
  • Municipal operations powered by 100% renewable energy by 2012 and all operations carbon neutral 2020.
  • Austin Energy: 55% renewable energy delivered to customers by 2015. This includes goals of 1000 MW of demand side management, over 1500MW of wind, 600MW of solar, energy storage, and all coal ownership retirement.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Inventories: We conduct a city-wide inventory every 3 years using ICLEI-USA’s U.S. Community Protocol and annually using the Climate Registry for municipal operations. Our municipal inventory has been third party verified twice.
  • The Austin Community Climate Plan was adopted by City Council in June of 2015
  • In October 2015, the Austin City Council approved power contracts for Austin Energy to purchase over 400MW of utility scale solar power.

New Actions to Announce:

  • In October 2015 Austin City Council authorized Austin Energy to secure up to 450MW of additional solar PPAs. When installed, and combined with the 30MW already built, the 150MW already authorized but not built, Austin should be at or near the top solar- powered cities in America. Council also directed Austin Energy to pursue bids to purchase or own 150MW more by 2019.

Berkeley, California

Targets:

  • Community-wide GHG reductions of 80% below 2000 levels by 2050; this translates to 33% below 2000 levels by 2020.
    Zero waste by 2020.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Building Energy Saving Ordinance (BESO): Effective December 1, 2015, Berkeley’s Building Energy Savings Ordinance (BESO) is designed to catalyze investment in energy-saving upgrades in homes and businesses. BESO requires property owners to conduct a building energy assessment that provides tailored recommendations for energy-saving opportunities and incentives for all commercial and multifamily buildings (phased in by size) and residential homes at time of sale. BESO is designed to uncover opportunities to for building owners to minimize wasted energy, improve occupant comfort, and lower utility bills.
  • Solid Waste: GHG emissions from solid waste decreased 59% between 2000 and 2013, and 18% between 2012 and 2013 alone.
  • Water: The City reduced water consumption in municipal operations by 29% compared to 2013 levels.
  • Transportation:
    EVs: The number of EVs in Berkeley has nearly tripled in the last 2 years,
    bringing the estimated total to approximately 750 EVs. The City also launched a Residential Curbside EV Charging Pilot program in December 2014. This Pilot offers home charging opportunities for residents that lack off-street parking by allowing for the creation of new front yard spaces for EV charging or for curbside EV charging stations.
    Parking Demand Management: The City launched the goBerkeley Pilot Program in 2013 which showed that parking and transportation demand management strategies can be effectively linked to improve parking conditions and reduce congestion and GHG emissions

New Actions to Announce:

  • 2013 GHG Emissions Trends: Berkeley reduced its community-wide GHG emissions by 9% between 2000 and 2013.
  • Idea Competition: Berkeley is developing an “idea competition” in partnership with the cities of Palo Alto, Santa Monica, and Aspen, CO through a grant from the Urban Sustainability Directors Network. This “idea competition” is designed to engage experts, entrepreneurs, and other interested stakeholders in helping the City develop additional, viable emissions reduction strategies. Staff anticipates launching the competition in Berkeley in early 2016, and hopes that the process will result in several actionable GHG-reduction strategies.

Boston, Massachusetts

Targets:

  • 25% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020, below 2005 level, and carbon neutral by 2050

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Mayor Walsh serves as the North American Co-Chair on the C40 steering committee.
  • Rated the most energy efficient city in the U.S. by ACEEE two years in a row.
  • Won international award for Greenovate Boston and community engagement at the Paris climate talks.
  • Compliant with the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy greenhouse gas emissions reporting Compact.
  • Updated the City’s Climate Action Plan in 2014 to reach climate goals.
  • Launched the Carbon Free Boston initaitive to support rapid action to become carbon neutral by 2050.
  • Launched the Renew Boston Trust initiative to pursue energy efficiency and resiliency in Boston’s building portfolios by using a proven self-funded financing model.

Boulder, Colorado

Targets:

  • 80% reduction in community-wide GHG emissions by 2050, below 2005 baseline
  • 100% clean, renewable electricity by 2030
  • 80% reduction in city operation GHG emissions by 2030, below 2008 baseline
  • Member of the 17 city member Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA)

Significant Climate Actions:

  • First in the nation to pass a Climate Action Plan (CAP) tax to fund initiatives to reduce GHG emissions
  • Completed baseline GHG Inventory, and ones in 2010 and 2012. Starting in 2015, performing annual inventories.
  • City facilities have saved more than 20% to date in emissions through a performance contract initiated in 2009
  • In 2010, the city adopted the SmartRegs ordinance to help promote and improve energy efficiency in rental housing units
  • An accelerated Net-Zero Energy Code, adopted in 2013, requires new and remodeled residential and commercial buildings to meet net-zero energy by 2031
  • Achieved Solar Friendly Community Platinum designation in 2014 and introduced the Boulder Solar Tool (http://mapdwell.com/boulder) in 2015 to aid the community’s understanding of individual building and aggregated urban rooftop solar PV potential
  • The Universal Zero Waste Ordinance was adopted in July 2015
  • The Building Performance Ordinance was adopted in October 2015, requiring all large commercial and industrial buildings to rate and report their energy use and perform energy efficiency over time
  • Boulder launched a community-wide engagement process around climate commitment strategy that will extend through Q1 of 2016

Columbus, Ohio

Targets:

  • Reduce GHG emissions 30 percent by 2020, 40 percent by 2030 (city operations, 2005 baseline) and 20 percent by 2020 (community-wide, 2013 baseline).
  • Develop a climate preparedness plan by 2017.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Released the climate adaptation plan focused on drinking water resources, Sustaining Scioto. Currently working on a vulnerability assessment and climate adaptation plan to address other impacts associated with climate change.
  • Columbus’ Fleet was voted greenest fleet in North America in 2011, 167 CNG vehicles in the fleet, anti-idling devises on all vehicles and have reduced petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions since 2005. Central Ohio Transit Authority goal to replace allbuses to run on CNG by 2030. There is a network of infrastructure open to the public to support adoption of alternative fuel vehicles, CNG and EV.
  • As of 2015, the city is purchasing 14% of power used for city facilities in renewables, target of 100% by 2020
  • As of 2013, community wide GHG emissions are down 14%
  • As of 2014, municipal GHG emissions are down 25%

New Actions to Announce:

  • September 2015, Columbus launched an aggressive urban tree canopy campaign, Branch Out Columbus, a collaboration of over 20 organizations, whose goal is to plant 300,000 medium sized trees by 2020, raising the canopy from 22% to 27%. Including a goal to build four urban tree nurseries on vacant and abandoned land within low-income / low- tree canopy neighborhoods by 2020.

Denver, Colorado

Targets:

  • Denver has set a goal to return to 1990 emissions levels by 2020. As of 2015 Denver was on target to meet this goal.
  • Denver has set a goal for citywide energy use in 2020 to be no greater than it was in 2012, despite population increases of over two percent annually, while reducing the fossil fuel content of that energy by 50%.
  • Denver has set an 80 x 50 goal and is currently developing strategies to hit that target.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Mayor Hancock has signed on to the Mayor’s National Climate Action Agenda and the Compact of Mayors.
  • Denver has conducted annual greenhouse gas inventories since 2009, helping to inform the 2015 climate action plan update.
  • Denver was one of the first major cities to complete a climate vulnerability assessment and adaptation plan, released in 2014.
  • By 2020, Denver will reduce the energy use intensity (EUI) of its more than 6 million square foot portfolio of municipal government buildings by 20%; it is ahead of pace, already having reduced its EUI by 9%.
  • Denver was designated as a Solar America City in 2008 and the first Solar Friendly Community in 2012 for its work to simplify the solar permitting process, helping to increase solar capacity in the community to 23 Megawatts through 2013.
  • In 2015, Denver International Airport (DEN) was the 4th U.S. airport group certified to Airports Council International’s Airport Carbon Accreditation standard, the only institutionally-endorsed, carbon management certification standard for airports.
  • DEN also hosts 10 megawatts of solar, one of the largest totals of any airport in the world, supplying a significant portion of the city’s more than 20M kWh of solar energy production annually.
  • Denver expanded its use of cleaner-burning alternative fuels by opening its first Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling station in 2014 and purchased 40 refuse trucks that run on CNG.
  • Denver is the only major city in the United States that requires all city agencies to participate in the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System, as certified by audit.

New Actions to Announce:

  • Denver is committed to developing innovative transportation solutions to move our people safer, smarter and more sustainability through a partnership with the Rocky Mountain Institute and with the Colorado Department of Transportation’s Technology in Transportation effort.
  • In 2016 Denver amended its building code to update to the 2015 version of the International Energy Conservation Code, and added language requiring that all new single-family homes include wiring for electric vehicles.
  • In 2016 Denver adopted an ordinance to require all commercial buildings of 25,000 sq. ft. or larger to benchmark and disclose energy consumption through the U.S. EPA’s Energy Star tool.
  • Denver will host the 2017 Solar Decathlon.

Fort Collins, Colorado

Targets:

  • The 2015 Fort Collins Climate Action Plan Framework established greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals of 20% below 2005 levels by 2020; 80% below 2005 levels by 2030
  • Carbon neutral by 2050.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Our efficiency programs have saved the energy equivalent of almost 3,000 homes in our community (26,600 megawatt-hours) generating in excess of $25 million in local economic benefits through reduced utility bills, direct rebates and leveraged investment.
  • Fort Collins businesses are saving more than $9.5M annually from improved efficiencies.
  • ClimateWise is Fort Collins’ free, voluntary program that offers simple solutions to help businesses reduce their impact, save money and gain recognition for their achievements in energy and water conservation, waste reduction, alternative transportation and social responsibility. In 2015, ClimateWise Partners realized $1,037,000 in annual cost savings by implementing cost-saving strategies to be more efficient and reduce operating costs.
  • Increased locally installed solar capacity by more than 500% from 2014 to 2015.
  • Partnered with three communities to install a 30-megawatt Community Solar Project.
  • Reduced emissions per capita 25%  while experiencing 18% growth in population and 40% growth in GDP.
  • Diverted about 60% of waste from the landfill while exploring ways to turn waste streams into profit streams.
  • Doubled transit ridership in less than 10 years (2016 will see more than 4 million trips for the first time ever) after significantly increasing investment in transit services, including Bus Rapid Transit and public-private partnerships to support system efficiency and maximize use of taxpayer dollars.
  • Incorporated technologies designed to monitor and adjust traffic management in real-time to reduce congestion and emissions, and increase ease of travel by all modes, and
  • Recognized as one of six Platinum level Bicycle Friendly Communities.

New Actions to Announce:

  • The City is currently developing its Climate Action Plan 2020 Strategic Plan to achieve the new GHG reduction targets adopted in 2015.
  • Complimentary to the 2020 CAP Strategic Plan, an updated Energy Policy was adopted in November 2015 that includes targets for incremental annual reductions in building energy use by 2.5% per year by 2020 and achieving 20% renewables by 2020.

Houston, Texas

Targets:

  • 80% reduction by 2050 (2007 baseline)

Significant Climate Actions:

  • 80% of the City’s energy coming from renewable sources and a 50 MW solar project soon to come online.
  • The City of Houston is also implementing one of the largest LED streetlight conversion in the nation, helping the City meet stringent energy efficiency goals.
  • Though Houston’s municipal energy efficiency program, over six million square feet of City facilities are expected to achieve guaranteed energy use reductions of 30%, saving over 22 million kWh of electricity every year, with paybacks of, on average, less than ten years.
  • Two new light rail lines recently opened and a transformative redesign of the Houston region’s local bus system launched in 2015. An estimated 20% increase in ridership is expected with the new bus network.
  • The City of Houston has completed both municipal and city-wide climate inventories, and is updating its municipal Sustainability Plan.

Kansas City, Missouri

Targets:

  • 30% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 2000 levels by 2020, in municipal operations and citywide

  • 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 2000 levels by 2050

  • As of the end of 2013, have reduced greenhouse gas emissions 25% in municipal operations and 4% citywide since 2000.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Unanimous adoption by Mayor & City Council of the KCMO climate action plan in 2008.
  • Commitment to annual updates to our municipal greenhouse gas emission inventory & triennial updates to our citywide greenhouse gas emission inventory.
  • Reduction of electricity use in municipal operations by 21% from 2000 to 2013 and achievement of ENERGY STAR certification for City Hall (a 78-year old building) in 2012 with a score of 92.
  • Utilization of a unique proprietary software system (Enterprise Sustainability Platform) to monitor & manage energy use in municipal buildings.
  • Installation of 25 kW solar installations on the rooftops of 59 municipal buildings.
  • Installation of 13 electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at City sites in partnership with our local investor-owned utility, who are installing 1,100 EV charging stations across the metro area: the largest system of its kind in the U.S.
  • Conversion of traffic signal lights to LEDs.
  • Adoption of LEED Gold certification requirement for new municipal building construction & renovations.
  • Adoption of an Energy Empowerment ordinance in 2015 requiring KCMO municipal buildings > 10,000 sq ft and non-municipal buildings > 50,000 sq ft to benchmark & report energy/water use.
  • Expansion of Bus Rapid Transit lines in the City and construction of new City streetcar system that will begin operations in 2016.

Los Angeles, California

Targets:

  • Los Angeles is committed to a 45% reduction in greenhouse gases by 2025, 60% by 2030, and 80% by 2050 (1990 baseline).

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Mayor Garcetti serves on the C40 steering committee; represents the largest city on President Obama’s Climate Task Force; and co-created the Mayors’ National Climate Action Agenda, a national movement to drive cities to take action and improve standards for carbon inventories and climate action.
  • Developing a comprehensive climate action and adaptation plan, including an annual standardized GHG inventory.
  • By 2017 we will expand the Better Buildings Challenge (BBC) to over 60 million square feet, and avoid 1250 GWh of energy use due to efficiency programs.
  • By 2017, will install at least 1 MW of solar on LA Convention Center rooftop.
  • LA has the greatest amount of solar power – in terms of installed capacity of MW – of any US City and by 2025, will increase cumulative total MW of local solar power to 900-1,500 MW.
  • LA is ahead of schedule to meet goal of 1,000 publicly available charging stations by 2017
  • By 2025, Los Angeles will eliminate its use of coal-fired electricity.

New Actions to Announce:

  • Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a commitment to lease 160 pure battery EV vehicles, a move that will give Los Angeles the largest city-owned pure EV fleet in America. The program commits city departments to the leasing of pure battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) to replace aging city vehicles — including those with conventional internal combustion engines. The announcement comes on the eve of the U.S.-China Climate Leaders Summit.
  • Los Angeles will release its Draft Climate Action Plan. The initial report is here.

New York City, New York

Targets:

  • 80% by 2050 on 2005 baseline, with a 40% reduction by 2030 on 1990 baseline.
  • From buildings, the City is targeting a 30% reduction by 2025.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • The City compiles an annual GHG inventory.
  • A 38 member stakeholder advisory group is developing detailed recommendations for building GHG and energy reduction opportunities in conjunction with the City.
  • Compact of Mayors, member of Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, ICLEI, C40.
  • Issued RFI to procure 100% of City electricity from renewable sources.
  • All City government buildings to be retrofitted for energy efficiency by 2025.
  • B20 diesel required for City heavy equipment (B5 in the winter).
  • Launching Citywide ferry service.
  • Launched comprehensive City plan in 2015 -- One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City (OneNYC). It adds three new sectors to the climate action plan, which first included buildings: power, transportation and waste. Zero Waste goal and plan announced. Equity is included explicitly as part of OneNYC, which also includes inclusive growth, transit-oriented development and affordable housing goals. NYC also has a comprehensive climate resiliency plan, and relies on the work of the New York City Panel on Climate Change, composed of leading scientists, who make climate projections for the city.

Oakland, California

Targets:

  • 36% by 2020, 83% by 2050 (2005 baseline).

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Retrofitted 100% of trucks and installed shore power at 11 berths at the Port of Oakland, part of a documented success in eliminating more than 165 tons of particulate matter from environmentally sensitive areas since 2005.
  • Beginning in 2015, the City’s new Zero Waste franchise agreements and expanded services are resulting in emissions reductions of more than 450,000 metric tonnes per year.
  • Currently constructing a new Bus Rapid Transit line through the most economically disadvantaged areas of the City, reducing GHG emissions while improving transit and air quality outcomes for the most vulnerable populations in the City.

New Actions to Announce:

  • Oakland has been selected as one of 12 Leaders Circle communities by Resilient Cities for America, recognized for their success in addressing greenhouse gas emissions at the local level.

Orlando, Florida

Targets:

  • Reduce GHG emissions 90% by 2040 (city-wide)
  • Achieve 50% renewable energy by 2040 (city-wide)
  • Achieve 100% renewable energy by 2030 (municipal operations)
  • Achieve 100% fleet vehicles using alternative fuels and electric by 2030 (municipal operations).

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Working towards a 30% reduction in energy consumption of Orlando government buildings and street lights through $17.5M green bond and revolving loan fund
  • Scaling community financing to retrofit residential buildings through PACE and SELF
  • Working towards running heavy trucks on CNG-hybrids
  • Rapid expansion of EV infrastructure, including fleet vehicles and transit buses
  • Expanding community solar on public buildings and brownfield sites .

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Targets:

Greenworks Philadelphia set the following goals:

  • Reduce municipal GHG emissions by 20% by 2015 (1990 baseline)
  • Reduce citywide GHG emissions by 20% by 2015 (1990 baseline)
  • Reduce citywide GHG emissions by 80% by 2050 (2003 baseline)

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Despite major increases in extreme weather events, Philadelphia has reduced municipal emissions by 15% to-date, primarily through large-scale energy efficiency retrofit projects, converting 100% of traffic signals to LEDs (85,000), and fuel efficiency gains.
  • Philadelphia will be setting updated short-term and long-term GHG and sustainability goals in 2016 as part of a next sustainability planning process.
  • Passed benchmarking and disclosure legislation, requiring commercial buildings 50,000+ square feet to annually report energy use through EPA's Energy Star tool; the program is in its third year of implementation, with a 90% compliance rate.
  • Achieved a 12% decrease in vehicle miles traveled between 2005-2013, enhancing mode share through transit improvements, enhanced bike infrastructure, and the successful launch of Indego bike share.
  • SEPTA, the transit authority, has built one of the nation's largest hybrid fleets with 460 Hybrid-Electric Buses replacing Diesel Buses, achieving a 14% improvement in fuel consumption/56% decrease in nitrogen oxide/96% decrease in particulate matter.
  • Worked with climate scientists to model climate projections for the Philadelphia region, providing robust, publicly available data.
  • The two major climate risks Philadelphia faces are increased flooding and heat. To mitigate against these risks, we have:
    • Installed 581 new greened acres actively managing stormwater through the City's Green City, Clean Waters program.
    • Added 157 new acres of open space, primarily in underserved parts of the city.
    • Planted over 121,000 new trees in parts of the city with low tree canopy.

Phoenix, Arizona

Targets:

  • Reduce GHG emissions by 80% by 2050 (2005 baseline).
  • Reduce GHG emissions for city operations by 15% by 2015 (2009 baseline).
  • Reduce GHG emissions for city-owned buildings by 20% by 2020 (2009 baseline).
  • Supply 15% of its energy use in city-owned building operations from renewable energy by 2025.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Mayor Greg Stanton is a member of the C40 Compact of Mayors and the Mayors’ National Climate Change Action Agenda, and serves as the chair U.S. Conference of Mayors Environment Committee.
  • Created the largest municipal fleet of alternative fuel vehicles in the nation, saving 60 million gallons of petroleum throughout the Phoenix region.
  • Supported the construction of 25 MW of solar energy production on 24 different sites, including city parking garage rooftops, water treatment facilities and landfills.
  • Half of the city’s public works buildings use solar power.
  • Conducting the region’s first GHG inventory.
  • Setting significant 2050 sustainability goals and interim targets for land use, transportation, air quality, water stewardship, waste and local food systems.
  • Committing more than $6 million annually toward projects that help protect against water shortages through a new Colorado River Resiliency Fund.
  • Converting the city’s 90,000 street lights to LED within three years.

New Actions to Announce:

  • Tripling the size of the City of Phoenix’s light rail system by 2050.

Portland, Oregon

Targets:

  • 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by 2050
  • 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by 2030
  • As of 2014, Portland GHG emissions are 21% below 1990. On a per capita basis, emissions have fallen more than 40% since 1990. 

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Electricity for City operations is 100% renewable power.
  • Electric vehicles comprise more than 20% of the City’s sedan fleet. 
  • City Council has adopted zoning code changes to prohibit the construction of large-scale new fossil fuel infrastructure.
  • In 2015, Portland opened the Tilikum Crossing, the largest car-free bridge in North America, to carry the region’s newest light rail line and also accommodate the Portland streetcar, buses, pedestrians and bicyclists.
  • Houses that are listed for sale in Portland must include a Home Energy Score in the listing.

Salt Lake City, Utah

Targets:

  • 2032 target: 100% of Community electricity from renewable sources
    2020 target: 50% of Municipal electricity comes from renewable source
  • 2040 target: 80% reduction in Community greenhouse gas footprint (2009 baseline)
    2030 target: 50% reduction in Community greenhouse gas footprint
  • Read more at: http://www.slcgreen.com/climatepositive

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Mayor Biskupski and the City Council adopted a Joint Resolution in 2016 committing to 100% renewable energy for the community electricity supply by 2032 and an 80% reduction in community greenhouse gas emissions by 2040.  The resolution also committed to 50% renewable energy for internal electricity use by 2020. 
  • Finalized a Clean Energy Cooperation Statement between Salt Lake City and Rocky Mountain Power.  This document highlights how the City and electric utility will collaborate on a number of energy and emissions reduction goals, including joint development of an Implementation Plan to help the City achieve 100% renewable energy for its community electricity supply.  The City also signed a five year Franchise Agreement with Rocky Mountain Power in 2016.
  • Distributed solar in Salt Lake City has grown by a factor of 25 between 2010 and 2015.
  • Enrolled 90 separate municipal electric meters in the Rocky Mountain Power Subscriber Solar program. These meters collectively subscribed to 3.0 megawatts of solar energy.
  • Procured installation services for solar arrays that will be installed on seven separate municipal buildings in 2017, including five fire stations, a police facility and the Regional Athletic Complex restroom.  Also participated in the Design Review Committee for two new Net Zero fire stations that will be constructed in 2016-17. 
  • Collaborated with the University of Utah on a discounted electric vehicle program, resulting in more than 130 all-electric and plug-in hybrids being sold or leased to community members in three months.
  • Procured 28 new Level 2 electric vehicle charging ports that will be installed at 11 separate public locations in early 2017.  
  • Continued to reduce emissions and save operational costs through the procurement of cleaner City fleet vehicles and enhanced vehicle management.  The City now operates over 115 hybrids, 24 CNG and a dozen all-electric vehicles in its government fleet.

New Actions to Announce:

  • Proposing an ordinance on energy benchmarking and transparency for Salt Lake City’s largest commercial buildings. We are still working with stakeholders on this, but we hope to see it pass this spring.

San Francisco, California

Targets:

  • Greenhouse gas emission reduction targets: 25% reduction by 2017; 40% by 2025; 80% by 2050 (1990 baselines)
  • San Francisco’s “0-50-100-Roots” Climate Action Strategy is a coordinated City effort to send zero waste to landfill without incineration by 2020, maintain 50% all trips by sustainable modes by 2018, achieve 100% renewable energy by 2030, and sequester carbon through urban forestry and compost application (Roots).

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Compact of Mayors and Under2MOU signatory
  • Member of C40, Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, US Mayors National Climate Action Agenda
  • 2012 greenhouse gas emissions were at an unprecedented 23 percent below 1990 levels despite growth in City’s economy and population
  • Zero Waste:
    - 99% of all properties in San Francisco are compliant with having mandatory composting and recycling service.
    - Less than 20% of material discards generated in San Francisco are now landfilled in our progress toward zero waste

  • Transportation & Energy:
    - The City’s Transit-First policy and programs have been successful in getting San Franciscans to take 50% of all trips by sustainable modes ahead of the 2018 goal.
    - San Francisco’s cable car lines, the nation’s largest fleet of electric trolley buses, and historic Muni streetcars are all supported by clean, GHG-free electricity from the City’s Hetch-Hetchy hydro power system.
    - In 2015, the City’s non-electric public transit busses, fire trucks and all other diesel powered fleet vehicles transitioned to 100% renewable diesel, reducing the diesel fleet’s GHG footprint by 56% and improving local air quality.
    - San Francisco ranks as one of the top US cities for electric vehicle charging station availability on a per capita basis, with over 500 public charging stations citywide.
    - In 2016, San Francisco was the only city in the country awarded a US Department of Energy (USDOE) grant to increase market transformation of fuel cell electric vehicles.

  • Energy & Green Building:
    - The City is continuing its path to achieving the goal of 100% renewable electricity supply by 2030 with the launch in May 2016 of CleanPowerSF, San Francisco’s new Community Choice Aggregation program. CleanPowerSF will exceed the state’s goal of 33% renewable by providing a default “Green” product that is 35% renewable and a premium “Super Green” product that is 100% renewable.
    - In 2016, San Francisco’s Energy Watch and BayREN energy efficiency programs provided professional auditing services, upgrades, and incentives to almost 400 commercial and multi-family (1,660 units) property owners. In total, the programs saved almost two megawatts of energy and paid nearly $2.5M in incentives.
    - In 2016, San Francisco became the first major city in the United States to require solar photovoltaic and/or living roof installations on new residential and commercial developments.
    - 6.9 million square feet of San Francisco’s municipal-owned and operated properties are LEED certified, an increase from 4 million square feet in 2014. Citywide, 103 million square feet are LEED certified and two-thirds are LEED Gold or Platinum.

  • Urban Forestry:
    - The City has launched the Citywide Street Tree Census, following the 2015 adoption of the Urban Forest Plan, and is on track to add over 50,000 street trees in the next 20 years.
    - San Francisco to date has awarded over $13 million in environmental grants to non-profits and community based organizations targeting low income communities in order to increase access to solar and energy efficiency projects, promote green jobs, reduce air pollution, and build community gardens.
     


Santa Monica, California

Targets:

  • 20% GHG emissions reduction below 1990 baseline levels by 2020.
  • 30% GHG emissions reduction below 1990 baseline levels by 2030.
  • 80% GHG emissions reduction below 1990 baseline levels by 2050.
  • Water-Self Sufficient by 2020.
  • Zero Waste by 2030.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • The City’s Big Blue Bus fleet converted to 100% renewable natural gas from landfill- captured methane.
  • The City produces 70% of its water locally, avoided energy-intensive imported water.
  • The City’s newest Pico Branch Library features a 12,000 gallon cistern that treats captured rainwater for flushing the toilets.
  • Santa Monica’s Landscape Rebate Program has helped residents and businesses remove 283,989 square feet of thirsty turf since 2014.
  • The City provides medicine drop-off and hazardous waste curbside pickup service.
  • Over 15 years, Santa Monicans have installed over 5 MW of solar citywide. In 2015, the City’s Solar Santa Monica program was recognized by the Conference of Mayor’s Climate Protection Awards.
  • The City is partnering with the Center for Sustainable Energy to train local solar contractors to be able to develop virtual net energy metering projects for multifamily properties.
  • In 2011, Santa Monica adopted its Bike Action Plan to increase biking in the City. Since adoption the bicycle network has increased from 37 miles to 82 miles and peak period cycling has increased by 79%.
  • In 2013, Santa Monica completed its award-winning Tongva Park, adding 7 acres of botanical diversity, open space and recreation. It is one of six finalists in the Urban Land Institute Global Award of Excellence for Urban Space.
  • In 2015, City Council adopts a resolution to join a study to assess the feasibility of a regional Community Choice Aggregation entity.
  • Santa Monica is leading a sea level rise and shoreline change study that will inform a vulnerability and risk assessment for the LA coastal region.

New Actions to Announce:

  • The City is currently planning the design and construction of a centralized 60,000 square foot City Services Building, with the intent to achieve Living Building Challenge certification.
  • In 2015, the City will launch the first bikeshare program in LA County.
  • In 2015, the City will launch a carshare pilot.
  • In 2015, Santa Monica will retrofit 1,500 streetlights to LED.
  • Santa Monica joined the Compact of Mayors in 2015.
  • Santa Monica is currently initiating the development of its 2030/2050 Climate Action and Adaptation Plan which will be completed in early 2017.

Seattle, Washington

Targets:

  • Carbon neutral by 2050
  • 58% reduction in GHG emissions by 2030 from 2008 baseline

Significant Climate Actions:

  • Adopted a comprehensive Climate Action Plan which provides a roadmap to carbon neutrality through strategies that enhance community, economic, and equity goals.
  • We conduct a city-wide inventory every 3 years using ICLEI-USA’s U.S. Community Protocol for Accounting and Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions.
  • Member of the MNCAA, Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, Compact of Mayors
  • Seattle reLeaf completed the sixth season of the Trees for Neighborhoods (T4N) project, distributing nearly 1,000 trees to 427 households in 2014 in neighborhoods across Seattle.
  • Seattle City Light, the city’s municipally-owned electric utility, maintains a carbon neutral electricity supply, and remains committed to meeting all future load growth with conservation and renewables.
  • Seattle is one of fourteen U.S. cities that have enacted Energy Benchmarking policies requiring building owners to track energy performance and annually report to the City. With an unprecedented 99% of required buildings reporting, Seattle’s building owners and managers are well-poised to use this data to substantially reduce their energy use. The building energy performance data is publicly available.
  • Seattle adopted a Building Tune-Ups policy which phases in a periodic tune-up requirement for nonresidential buildings 50,000 square feet or larger. Tune-ups aim to optimize energy and water performance by identifying no- or low-cost actions related to building operations and maintenance, focusing on actions that typically pay back within 3 years and generate 10-15% in energy savings, on average.
  • Strengthened Seattle’s energy code beyond national standard.
  • The City adopted a Resource Conservation Management Plan in 2013 to guide action to meet the City’s goal of reducing energy use in existing City buildings by 20% by 2020 from a 2008 baseline.
  • Adopted the Safe Streets, Healthy Schools and Communities five-year action plan that guides investments for engineering improvements, education, encouragement, and enforcement around schools to increase students walking and biking to school.
  • Banned compostable materials from garbage for residential and commercial customers. Also, banned additional construction, remodeling and demolition waste materials.
  • Member of the MNCAA, Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance, Compact of Mayors

Somerville, Massachusetts

Targets:

  • Carbon neutrality for community by 2050.
  • As a Massachusetts Green Community, 20% municipal energy use reduction of 2011 levels by 2017
  • 50% of all new trips will be by transit, walking or biking by 2030.

Significant actions:

  • Second city in Massachusetts to sign on to Compact of Mayors, September 2015.
  • New GHG baseline (2014) inventory that is GPC compliant to be released in November 2015.
  • Replacing HPS outdoor lighting citywide (4000+fixtures).
  • Electric vehicle charging infrastructure installed in 2015 as well as city’s first 4 all-electric fleet vehicles.
  • Launched widely recognized Somerville GreenTech program to pilot early-stage green technologies.
  • Launched long-term climate change planning initiative, SustainaVille.

Washington, D.C.

Targets:

  • Committed to 50% by 2032, 80% by 2050 below 2006 GHG levels and we a member of the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance.
  • Sustainable DC Plan adopted in 2013 with targets to cut energy use 50% and expand the use of renewable energy to 50% by 2032.
  • Sustainable DC Plan also sets a target for new buildings to meet net –zero energy use standards by 2032.

Significant Climate Actions:

  • In 2013, adopted the new green construction and energy conservation codes for buildings.
  • Mayor recently signed a power purchase agreement for 46MW of wind power that will provide 35% of the District Government’s electricity, avoiding 100,000 tons of carbon emissions every year. In recognition, the U.S. EPA awarded the District its Green Power Leadership Award in 2015.
  • Working on the District’s first citywide climate adaptation plan Committed to and fully compliant with the Compact of Mayors.
  • Emissions publicly reported (to CDP) annually.
  • In 2014, adopted new green construction and energy conservation codes for buildings.
  • Currently developing the District’s first citywide climate adaptation plan.
  • In October 2015, DC Water, which operates the world’s largest advanced wastewater treatment plant and is the District’s single largest energy user, unveiled its $470 million waste-to-energy project that is producing a net 10 megawatts (MW) of electricity from the wastewater treatment process, providing clean, renewable energy to power about one-third of the wastewater treatment plants energy needs.
  • Thanks to its green building and energy benchmarking requirements, DC had the most ENERGY STAR certified buildings of any U.S. metropolitan area in 2015, and leads all U.S. cities in LEED certified square footage per capita.
  • The DC Sustainable Energy Utility (DCSEU) was created to help DC residents and businesses invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy. Since 2011, the DCSEU has delivered financial incentives, technical assistance, and information to tens of thousands of District residents and businesses, helping them to save millions of dollars on their energy costs.
  • Requires electric utilities to supply 20% renewable energy by 2020, including 2.5% local solar by 2023. DC provides no-cost solar to low-income residents through its Solar Advantage Plus Program, installing more than 130 systems last year. This year DC is rolling out community solar to continue expand the number of DC residents and business that can benefit from going solar.